Category: African-American

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Albert Einstein teaching at Lincoln, the United State’s first Historical Black University, 1946.

Life of African-Americans during WWII through stunning color…

Life of African-Americans during WWII through stunning color photos.

Yesterday's Print 2018-12-28 01:58:30

Mabel Taylor photographed by Joseph J Pennell, Kansas, 1919

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Summit Avenue Ensemble, Atlanta, Georgia. …

Summit Avenue Ensemble, Atlanta, Georgia. 1899. 

Photograph shows a group of six young men posed with their instruments in the photographer’s home studio on Summit Avenue, Atlanta, Ga. From left: the photographer’s twin sons Clarence and Norman Askew, son Arthur Askew, neighbor Jake Sansome, and sons Robert and Walter Askew.

Thomas E. Askew, 1850?-1914, photographer.  

Cool groovy pair. (undated)

Cool groovy pair. (undated)

The title of this photo from 1897 is I’s…

The title of this photo from 1897 is I’s a Little Alabama Coon.

For generations, Americans fostered and accepted the image of “the happy Negro.”
  He was an amiable, faithful, but generally feckless individual, addicted to buffoonery and perfectly content to loll around the cabin plucking on the banjo all day. 

“The happy Negro” was the natural extension of “the contented slave,” a creature fabricated by the southern plantation owners to counteract the suspicion that human slavery was something less than a benevolent institution. He was created as a double-edged denial of two intolerable propositions: that Negro slaves were constantly on the verge of flight and revolt; and that the slaves were controlled through a policy of calculated brutality and terror. Like so many other figments of the Southern Way of Life, this one duly became a fixture of the national ethos. The myth of “the contented slave” was quite easily translated into the myth of “the happy Negro,” and there the myth remained for many decades. 

Hoyt W. Fuller (September 10, 1923 – May 11, 1981).

Happy Mose. c1911.

Happy Mose. c1911.

Happy John. c1897.

Happy John. c1897.

Florence Mills, 1926

Florence Mills, 1926

Ebony magazine, January 1960

Ebony magazine, January 1960