Category: vintage

50 glamorous photos of Danielle Darrieux in the 1930s and 1940s.

50 glamorous photos of Danielle Darrieux in the 1930s and 1940s.

Popeye makes an appearance at the 1986 Macy’s…

Popeye makes an appearance at the 1986 Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade.

Papou’s Restaurant, West Frankfort, Illinois, 1929.

Papou’s Restaurant, West Frankfort, Illinois, 1929.

Happy day, 1970s.

Happy day, 1970s.

Sacramento, California. 1866.

Sacramento, California. 1866.

Sacramento is the oldest incorporated city in California, incorporated on February 27, 1850. During the early 1850s, the Sacramento valley was devastated by floods, fires and cholera epidemics. Despite this, because of its position just downstream from the Mother Lode in the Sierra Nevada, the new city grew, quickly reaching a population of 10,000.

The California State Legislature, with the support of Governor John Bigler, moved to Sacramento in 1854. The capital of California under Spanish (and, subsequently, Mexican) rule had been Monterey, where in 1849 the first Constitutional Convention and state elections were held. The convention decided that San Jose would be the new state’s capital. After 1850, when California’s statehood was ratified, the legislature met in San Jose until 1851, Vallejo in 1852, and Benicia in 1853, before moving to Sacramento. In the Sacramento Constitutional Convention of 1879, Sacramento was named to be the permanent state capital.

Begun in 1860 to be reminiscent of the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C., the Classical Revival style California State Capitol was completed in 1874. In 1861, the legislative session was moved to the Merchants Exchange Building in San Francisco for one session because of massive flooding in Sacramento. The legislative chambers were first occupied in 1869 while construction continued. From 1862 to 1868, part of the Leland Stanford Mansion was used for the governor’s offices during Stanford’s tenure as the Governor; and the legislature met in the Sacramento County Courthouse.

With its new status and strategic location, Sacramento quickly prospered and became the western end of the Pony Express. Later it became a terminus of the First Transcontinental Railroad, which began construction in Sacramento in 1863 and was financed by “The Big Four"—Mark Hopkins, Charles Crocker, Collis P. Huntington, and Leland Stanford. Both the American and especially Sacramento rivers would be key elements in the economic success of the city. In fact, Sacramento effectively controlled commerce on these rivers, and public works projects were funded though taxes levied on goods unloaded from boats and loaded onto rail cars in the historic Sacramento Rail Yards.

In 1850 and again in 1861, Sacramento citizens were faced with a completely flooded town. In 1861, Governor Leland Stanford, who was inaugurated in early January 1861, had to attend his inauguration in a rowboat, which was not too far from his house in town on N street. The flood waters were so bad, the legend says, that when he returned to his house, he had to enter into it through the second floor window. From 1862 until the mid-1870s Sacramento raised the level of its downtown by building reinforced brick walls on its downtown streets, and filling the resulting street walls with dirt. Thus the previous first floors of buildings became the basements, with open space between the street and the building, previously the sidewalk, now at the basement level. Over the years, many of these underground spaces have been filled or destroyed by subsequent development. However, it is still possible to view portions of the "Sacramento Underground”.

Dutch Flat, Placer County. California, 1866.

Dutch Flat, Placer County. California, 1866.

Dutch Flat was founded by two German brothers, Joseph and Charles Dornbach who settled there in 1851 during the California Gold Rush. The area was once one of the richest gold mining locations in California.

While Dutch Flat was originally settled by miners, it first gained prominence as an important stagecoach stop, making it one of the largest and most important towns in Placer County from about 1864 to 1866.

Maricopa women harvesting “hasen&rdq…

Maricopa women harvesting “hasen”, the sweet, pear-sized fruit from the giant Saguaro cactus, which may be eaten fresh or dried or used to make syrup or wine. Arizona, 1907.

50 amazing photos that document everyday life of a Wyoming girl…

50 amazing photos that document everyday life of a Wyoming girl in the early 20th century.

Market Street, San Francisco, California, July 1966.

Market Street, San Francisco, California, July 1966.

Unknown Worlds No. 21, October-November 1966

Unknown Worlds No. 21, October-November 1966